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Deutsches Frauenwerk/ WW2 german women's welfare booklet

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Original price $125.00
Original price $125.00 - Original price $125.00
Original price $125.00
Current price $99.99
$99.99 - $99.99
Current price $99.99

Title: "WW2 German Women's Welfare Booklet: 'Deutsches Frauenwerk'"

Description: A relic from the World War II era, this 'Deutsches Frauenwerk' booklet offers a glimpse into the women's welfare system in Nazi Germany. Measuring at 4.75 x 3.25 inches, this piece provides a tangible connection to the lives of women during a tumultuous time in history. Its pages may hold valuable insights into the state-driven welfare initiatives, social programs, and the broader role of women in German society during the 1930s and 1940s.

Product Details:

  • Title: Deutsches Frauenwerk
  • Origin: Germany, World War II era
  • Dimensions: 4.75 x 3.25 inches
  • Language: German
  • Condition: excellent for age
  • Content: Booklet is almost full with various stamps"Deutsches Frauenwerk" translates to "German Women's Work" or "German Women's Enterprise" in English. It was an organization during the Nazi era that aimed to indoctrinate and educate women in line with the values and goals of the Nazi Party.

Brief History of the Women's Welfare System in Nazi Germany: The women's welfare system in Nazi Germany was an intricate web of state-driven initiatives aimed at promoting the role of women as bearers of the Aryan race and caretakers of the traditional family unit. Under the Nazi regime, women were heavily encouraged, if not pressured, to embrace their roles as mothers, homemakers, and supporters of the state.

The 'Deutsches Frauenwerk' (German Women’s Enterprise) was a National Socialist organization established to indoctrinate women into the ideals of the Nazi Party. It provided training and education, promoting the values of motherhood and homemaking while simultaneously embedding Nazi propaganda into its teachings.

Simultaneously, the regime restricted women's opportunities in higher education and employment, ensuring their primary roles remained rooted in domestic life. This booklet likely contains propaganda, guidelines, and other materials related to these welfare and indoctrination efforts.

It's essential to approach items from this era with sensitivity, recognizing the broader historical implications and the oppressive nature of the Nazi regime. This booklet serves as a crucial artifact for historians, educators, and collectors interested in understanding the intricate relationship between propaganda, gender roles, and state-controlled welfare during WW2 in Germany.

During the Nazi era in Germany, the regime often used various tools and methods to spread propaganda, build loyalty, and encourage participation in state-sanctioned activities. The use of stamp collection cards was one of these methods.

In the case of the "Deutsches Frauenwerk" and similar organizations, stamps could be collected for a variety of reasons:

  1. Rewards and Recognition: Stamps might be given out as rewards for participation in events, attending meetings, or fulfilling certain duties or roles within the organization. Collecting a full set of stamps might earn the holder some recognition or reward.

  2. Fundraising: Some stamps were purchased as a form of donation to Nazi charities or organizations. By buying a stamp, you were showing your financial support for the cause it represented.

  3. Educational Propaganda: The cards themselves, along with the stamps, often carried propagandistic imagery or slogans. Collecting and viewing these stamps would continuously expose the holder to Nazi ideology.

  4. Engagement and Loyalty: Having a card to fill would incentivize members to stay engaged with the organization, attend more events, or participate in more activities. It gave a tangible sense of progress and loyalty.

The system of collecting stamps was not unique to the Nazi era or Germany. Many countries and organizations have used similar systems, especially during wartime, to encourage participation, loyalty, and fundraising. However, under the Nazis, such systems were often co-opted and heavily imbued with propaganda to further the regime's ideological goals

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